Marcos Valle

Marcos Valle

Evolving from samba’s percussive pulse in the late 1950s, bossa nova (literal translation: new trend), is Brazil’s internationally accepted gift to the global melting pot of music.

Initially brought to prominence by the likes of Antônio Carlos Jobim, João Gilberto, and João Donato, by the mid-1960s, there was an emerging pool of youthful talent ready to make their voices heard. Marcos Valle and his lyricist brother Paulo Sergio were no exception. After signing to Odeon Records (a subsidiary of EMI) the pair penned a classic of the South American songbook, “Samba De Verão”—known in English as “So Nice (Summer Samba).” A musical trip to the United States in 1966, where the singer worked with Sergio Mendes and jazz giant Verve Records, provided even more inspiration. By the dawn of the 1970s, the multi-talented Valle was entering a new era, ready to test the government censors (Brazil was under strict military rule since a coup d’état in 1964) and express a socially aware stance and a playful hodge-podge of musical styles including samba, bossa nova, baião (a rhythmic beat from the rural northeast of Brazil), black American music, and rock.