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Baad John Cross

New Revolution - Chapter One

PMG
PMG073
Release Notes
  • This is a typical product of the early 80s, an amazing pop album with elements of latin and funk music
  • For fans of Rockwell, Kiki Gyan, Geraldo Pino, Kool And The Gang
  • Filled to the last groove with catchy tunes that feature awesome harmonies
  • An original affair for fans of groovy Nigerian afro pop funk
  • Excellent sound and performance by high class professional musicians
  • First ever rerelease on vinyl and CD
  • Fully licensed
  • Remastered audio
  • LP housed in a superheavy 430g art carton cover
  • CD housed in a beautiful digipak
  • Ultimate collectors item for fans of classic afro pop funk

Baad John Cross’s New Revolution is a Afro-electro-funk-boogie-disco banger that could only come from 1980s Nigeria. Bright, optimistic, with an unrelenting eye on the dance floor, it is regarded by many as a prototype of the electro rhythms that would become the signature sound of Nigerian boogie. A Cameroonian by birth, Cross arrived in Lagos a cheeky smile, a pair of white dungarees and a bag full of songs. After proving his chops with uncredited session work, he signed with the legendary Coconut label, hooked up with producer Modjo Isidore and created a stone cold boogie classic in New Revolution. ‘Gimme Some Lovin’ and ‘Get Up And Dance Salsa’ (briefly a dance craze in Lagos, apparently) are dance floor classics, ‘Jeanie My Love’ the obligatory love ballad and ‘We Need Freedom’ a Marleyesque call for peace across the continent. The real surprise is ‘Rock n Roll Birthday’, a rockabilly number straight out of 80’s London. (The cover photo has a similar vibe.) Sadly, New Revolution was to be Baad John Cross’s only album. He was soon back in Cameroon, eking out a career as a session musician, but not before creating one of the freshest Nigerian boogie albums ever made. – Peter Moore