Guy Skornik

Pour Pauwels

LION 676
Release Notes

• One of a handful of classic French progressive pop albums of the early 1970’s, together with Serge Gainsbourg’s “Melody Nelson," Igor Wakévitch’s “Hathor”, and Gérard Manset’s “La Mort D’Orion"

• Key member of François Wertheimer’s Popera Cosmic collective

• LP pressed in a one-time 180 gram edition of 500 copies + includes insert

• Licensed from Parlophone, A Warner Music Group Company.

Guy Skornik was a mystic explorer, psychonaut, and gifted musician, who was a key member of François Wertheimer’s Popera Cosmic collective; he was also deeply immersed in the metaphysical revolutions of his time. He presented television reports, laced with elements of Eastern mysticism, on LSD experiences. And then there was Skornik’s album, “Pour Pauwells”, inspired by the revolutionary writings of Louis Pauwells, one-time counterculture hero and disciple of esoteric spiritualist G. I. Gurdjieff. It is one of a handful of classic French progressive pop concept albums of the early 1970’s, together with Serge Gainsbourg’s “Melody Nelson," Igor Wakévitch’s “Hathor”, Gérard Manset’s “La Mort D’Orion," and Michel Berger’s “Puzzle.” Licensed from Parlophone, A Warner Music Group Company. Limited to 500 copies. Digipack + 28-page booklet.

“If you have not heard of Guy Skornik you do not know what you’ve lost… but don’t worry, it’s never too late. Guy was brought to the public’s attention for the first time in the beginning of 1970. Then it was the release in the middle of the year of a magnificent LP (on Pathé, of course!) I strongly recommend it to you as it is a masterpiece. He starts with a taste for surrealism and for all the strange things that have occurred over thousands of years on the earth’s surface; Skornik tried, and succeeded perfectly, to create with his music what Louis Pauwels did with his huge best-seller The Morning of the Magicians—a book that can be quickly defined as a popularization of many disturbing problems poorly understood by the general public, such as flying saucers, Atlantis, and Easter Island.” —Jacques Allemand (Extra magazine)