SHIPPING PAUSE / INTL ADJUSTMENTS: Due to a warehouse move, we are pausing shipment on all orders placed after December 9th. Orders will not resume shipping until March 2023. Any orders which include preorder items will be held to ship until all items are in stock, unless separate shipments are selected at checkout. ***Attention Non-US Customers: We are experiencing difficulty with our shipping options. For non-US orders with only 1-3 items (cassette, CD, or LP) - After your order is placed, please forward your confirmation email to [email protected] and we will adjust shipping when applicable.
Noel Ellis
Noelellis

Noel Ellis

It was an end-to-end burner for midnight tokers and cool rulers alike.

Noel is the son of legendary Studio One/Treasure Isle recording artist Alton Ellis, and this self-titled debut was recorded in Toronto in 1979 by studio wizard Jerry Brown for the pioneering Summer Records – often cited as Canada’s answer to Lee…

Read more...

Noel is the son of legendary Studio One/Treasure Isle recording artist Alton Ellis, and this self-titled debut was recorded in Toronto in 1979 by studio wizard Jerry Brown for the pioneering Summer Records – often cited as Canada’s answer to Lee Perry’s Black Ark Studios. This latest platter serves as the third release in the Jamaica to Toronto seven album series; following Wayne McGhie & The Sounds Of Joy(1970), and the recently released deluxe anthology Jamaica to Toronto: Soul Funk & Reggae 1967-74.

Noel Ellis features six dub-loved, heavy yet ethereal tracks, with contributions from OG reggae maestros Jackie Mittoo, Willi Williams, and Johnny Osbourne. The eponymous classic lost full-length includes the hugely influential Rocking Universally, whose rhythmic influence was Willi Williams’ “Armagideon Time” (covered by The Clash). The poignantly autobiographical “Memories” (about Noel’s upbringing in Jamaica) is a highpoint as well. “Stop Your Fighting” was a universal anti-materialism/war plea that we should still heed today, while “Marcus Garvey” was delivered in Noel’s playful style, despite a solemn rallying cry of “Africa it must be free.”

Noel Ellis evoked a transcendent majesty, and the album’s economical performances were a blessing compared to certain overproduced recordings of the era. Tasteful keys, varied percussion, essential echo, conquering dub changeovers, and Noel’s impeccable mic control gave an otherworldly twist to Summer’s remarkable drum and bass sound. It was an end-to-end burner for midnight tokers and cool rulers alike.

Gallery
News
Links/Additional Info